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HTC One SpecsPro Reviews

HTC One Review

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Submitted by MG3 on Apr 23, 2014

Don't let the 4-megapixels of resolution listed with the HTC One smartphone camera fool you. Using pixels on the unit's image sensor that are quite a bit larger in size than is average for a smartphone camera, the HTC One's camera is able to capture images at a quality that is a little bit above average versus other smartphone cameras. The HTC One is able to work fast in all tasks, including photography. This device's full HD display screen is sharp and bright, and the touchscreen is responsive. Don't expect this unit's camera to match what you'd find with an average point-n-shoot digital camera, but it performs adequately in most situations, especially in low light.
Published on: Apr 24, 2014
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HTC One (M8) vs HTC One (M7)

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Submitted by MG3 on Mar 28, 2014

HTC hit the mark in several areas with the M8, proving to us that they’re able to improve upon the foundation set forth by its predecessor. Even with all of the improvements, like its speedier performance, more stylish looks, and longer battery life, we can’t help but think about its camera. To tell you the truth, that’s single handedly the one thing we were hoping to see the most dramatic improvements. Rather, the generally quality of its photos remained unchanged before – enhanced instead by the myriad of duo effects courtesy of that secondary camera. Now comes the matter of pricing, something that always becomes the focal point for any consumer purchase. The new HTC One M8 is going on sale for $200 with a 2-year contract with most carriers – a befitting mark for a brand spanking new flagship smartphone. In contrast, the M7 can probably be picked up for dirt cheap nowadays. Heck, it’s likely that it can be found for free even, depending on where you look naturally! Bearing that in mind, it’s only fitting for budget conscious individuals to pick up the older model, but if cost is not an issue, then it’s only logical to snag HTC’s latest flagship. Quite simply, that’s probably going to be the biggest deciding factor. All roads point to the obvious here, where it’s painstakingly clear to pick up the newer device if you fancy the most cutting edge thing. You won’t be disappointed either, since improvements are seen in pretty much all aspects of the smartphone. Well, that still doesn’t mean you should totally disregard the aging model, seeing that it’s still a capable smartphone in itself. For what it’s worth, it can still tangle with some of the best – albeit, probably not at the highest capacity like its successor.
From: Phone Arena
Published on: Mar 28, 2014
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Sony Xperia Z1 Compact vs HTC One

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Submitted by MG3 on Feb 04, 2014

No conclusive winner can be cast when you pit the Z1 Compact with the HTC One, as they're two devices that specialize in somewhat different areas, though each is more than capable in pretty much every and all regards. The Xperia Z1 Compact, as the name suggests, is a great pick if you're tired of lugging around a big device, but you still don't want to compromise on the specs front. Moreover, its fancy shooter will certainly not leave you wanting. The HTC One's performance capabilities are lagging behind in terms of raw power, but that isn't saying a whole lot, seeing as the Snapdragon 800 is already so far ahead of the curve. It's speedy, and its camera, while lagging behind what rival flagships have to offer, is still adequate.. Little can stand in its way when it comes to its audio capabilities, too, and it makes for a great overall multimedia device that leaves very little to desire. The One is also, arguably, the more attractive device of the two, and that's saying something, as the Z1 Compact is a looker in its own right. In the end, we wish we could say that it comes down to a simple choice between practicality and looks, but that's just not the case. Both these devices are heavily invested in both these fields, though the Z1 Compact is definitely the more pragmatic of the two, while the HTC One sports the better looks and bigger, more detailed screen.
From: Phone Arena
Published on: Jan 29, 2014
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HTC One vs Moto X comparison review: Which Android smartphone is best?

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Submitted by MG3 on Jan 27, 2014

The Motorola Moto X may be a little cheaper but if you can afford the HTC One, you're getting a much more premium smartphone.
From: PC Advisor
Published on: Jan 20, 2014
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HTC One Review

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Submitted by MG3 on Nov 27, 2013

The HTC One is hands down, one of the fastest most feature rich cellphone on the market, which is not hurt in the slightest by it’s sultry good looks, original styling and stellar performance.
Published on: May 09, 2013
9.1 Rated at:

Google Nexus 5 vs HTC One

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Submitted by MG3 on Nov 15, 2013

It's amazing to see the progress of the Nexus series. With the new Nexus 5, Google finally ticks all the boxes – performance is top notch, the screen is good, and the camera is hugely improved. The HTC One on the other hand starts to show its age. We are still in love with its sturdy aluminum unibody and there's no denying the device is a looker, however the UltraPixel camera underperforms and actually fares way worse than the Nexus 5 shooter, and the Snapdragon 600 chip pales in comparison to the newer and faster 800. Not least, the Nexus features the latest Android version and is future proof – getting it you can be sure you'll be first in line for future Android updates while the HTC One runs on Android 4.2 and it will probably take months for it to go 4.4 KitKat, and it's unclear whether it will ever get updated further. With all this, you'd expect the lower-specced HTC One to cost less, but the reality of the situation is a bit more complicated. The Nexus 5 has a bargain low off-contract price of $350 for the 16GB version and $400 for the 32 gig model, whereas an unlocked One (32 GB) will set you back a whopping $580. For those of you who plan on getting it on-contract, though, the price varies. On Sprint, the HTC One can be had for as low as $20 with a new 2-year contract whereas the Nexus 5 costs $150. On T-Mobile, the down payment for the HTC One and Nexus 5 is almost the same, but total payments over two months work out to a higher price for the One. To sum up, the Nexus 5 is generally more affordable with some exceptions for U.S. carriers. Even if your operator offers the Nexus 5 at a higher price, though, we definitely feel it's justified to pay a bit more to get the Nexus, a device that is superior in almost every way.
From: Phone Arena
Published on: Nov 13, 2013
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HTC One vs Nexus 5 smartphone comparison review - which great Android phone should you buy?

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Submitted by MG3 on Nov 01, 2013

You should buy SIM free, and therefore you should buy the Nexus 5. Both are great handsets, but the Nexus 5 is priced to shift. However, if you are likely to purchase on contract, you have a choice to make between two brilliant Android phones. Either way you'll be happy.
From: PC Advisor
Published on: Nov 01, 2013
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HTC One Google Play edition: what's different?

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Submitted by MG3 on Oct 15, 2013

While the HTC One ships with one of the least obtrusive and most polished skins available today, stock Android just takes this handset in a completely new direction. Sure, you lose Zoe and the infrared transmitter (at least for the time being), but you gain Android 4.2.2, a better user experience and that smug feeling that you're enjoying something special. Why spend $599 for this Google Play edition when the Nexus 4 provides the same satisfaction for $299? The decision boils down to this: If you want LTE, a better camera and a beautiful design, pick this HTC One; if your budget is limited and Google Wallet is paramount, choose the Nexus 4. If you must have it all and can handle its cheap looks, spend a little more on Samsung's Galaxy S 4 with stock Android ($649). Ultimately, the HTC One Google Play edition is a phenomenal phone. There's only one caveat -- the lack of AWS band for HSPA+ is a major drawback if you're on T-Mobile in the US.
From: Engadget
Published on: Jul 05, 2013
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HTC One for T-Mobile: what's different?

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Submitted by MG3 on Oct 15, 2013

There's one other Android smartphone that deserves to be on your radar at T-Mobile, however, and that's the Nexus 4. Most significantly, the phone lacks LTE connectivity, and its display and camera are inferior in relation to the One, but at $299 for the 8GB model, it's far and away your best bet if the One's price tag is beyond your comfort zone. For everyone else, though, the HTC One is hands-down the best smartphone that you'll find on T-Mobile, and it's worth every penny.
From: Engadget
Published on: May 20, 2013
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Pure Android: Samsung Galaxy S4 and HTC One 'Google Play editions' review

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Submitted by MG3 on Oct 10, 2013

Android is in a strange place right now. Taken as a whole, it dominates the smartphone market. But as Apple CEO Tim Cook couldn’t help but point out earlier this month, the majority of those devices are running a version of the operating system created in 2010. Just as troubling, Google has watched Apple, Microsoft, and even BlackBerry release new operating systems that look and act just like the designers at those companies intended, no matter the manufacturer or the carrier. Google’s “openness” on Android has benefitted carriers and manufacturers at least as much it has consumers. As much as I’d like to see these new “Google Play edition” phones change this entire dynamic, I think it’s very unlikely given the history of the Nexus line. Luckily for you and for me, it’s not our job to fix the Android ecosystem. Instead, we just have to decide whether we want an Android phone and if so, which one is the best for us. It’s unfortunate that these phones aren’t available on all carriers and won’t be sold at subsidized prices. The HTC One Google Play edition retails for $599 and the Samsung Galaxy S4 Google Play edition sells for $649. There are carrier and price hurdles you have to jump over when choosing the stock Galaxy S4 or HTC One, but in my opinion they’re worth the leap.
Published on: Jun 26, 2013
8.6 Rated at:

Moto X vs HTC One: Smartphone Face-Off

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Submitted by MG3 on Oct 09, 2013

The HTC One took 5 out of 8 rounds in this contest and tied the Moto X in performance, making it the overall winner. The One offers a more premium design, sharper display and much better audio quality. Plus, it captured better looking photos. HTC’s Sense interface isn’t for everyone, but there’s more flexibility in the UI than with Motorola’s mostly stock interface. There are some reasons to get the Moto X instead of the HTC One. It offers a more compact design, convenient touchless voice controls and the ability to customize your design (just AT&T for now). The Moto X is also the phone to get if you hate any sort of Android skins. Overall, though, the HTC One is the better of these two smartphones.
Published on: Oct 07, 2013
7.5 Rated at:

Apple iPhone 5s vs HTC One

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Submitted by MG3 on Oct 09, 2013

Having been on the scene for a long time now, you’re more than likely to pick up the HTC One for far less than its typical $200 on-contract price point – probably around the sub $100 area if you look hard enough. And just to think, the base version of the HTC One carries along 32GB of storage. With that in mind, there’s no arguing that it packs a whole lot of value, as the HTC One has a balanced set of features to continue making it a noteworthy option. Rather amazing to say the least, it continues to be one of the best designed smartphones around, which says a lot about the handset. In addition, HTC Sense 5 has a very different look compared to other Android smartphones. Being Apple’s latest flagship, the base $200 price point of the iPhone 5s is going to stick around for the next year – with maybe a few sales every now and then. Regardless of that, it shows its superiority in key categories like taking photos/videos and processor performance. Physically, the look and design of the phone hasn’t changed whatsoever (color options aside), but we’re greeted with a refreshing new experience with iOS 7. Indeed, the platform’s functionality might not be as diverse as the Android driven HTC One, but it continues to deliver us with a simple, intuitive, and straightforward experience. So which one should you pick up? Well, if you’re looking to save some money, the HTC One is undoubtedly the device you should look at, since it has that perfect blend of value, performance, and good looks. It might not rival the iPhone 5s’ camera performance, but it’s still pretty good to accept. On the flip side, the iPhone 5s continues the legacy – it’s a solidly constructed smartphone, packs a snappy performance, and shoots some stunning looking photos and videos.
From: Phone Arena
Published on: Oct 08, 2013
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LG G2 vs HTC One: Game of phones

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Submitted by MG3 on Oct 07, 2013

HTC and LG both have been through tough times, and had the slimmest margin of error imaginable with their flagships. The One and the G2 are phones any manufacturer would be proud of, and many users will love. That's the thing really, these two are some easy gadgets to fall in love with. And so hard to pick between.
From: GSMArena
Published on: Sep 25, 2013
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HTC One Google Play Edition review: One for Google

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Submitted by MG3 on Oct 07, 2013

The HTC One Google Play Edition can be the perfect device for a narrow group of potential users. It is not going to enjoy even a fraction of the regular HTC One's popularity. It's not going to have a significant impact on the company's financial results, or even bring that much publicity considering the very limited availability. Still, the One Google Play Edition is HTC's badge of honor. By placing it alongside the Samsung Galaxy S4 in the Play Store, Google essentially acknowledges that the HTC One is one of the top two Android smartphones, driving the platform forward this past year. As far as recognition goes, it can hardly get any better for the HTC One.
From: GSMArena
Published on: Jul 28, 2013
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Sony Xperia Z1 vs HTC One

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Submitted by MG3 on Sep 30, 2013

The Sony Xperia Z1 comes half a year after the HTC One and good news is that Sony has used the time fully to its advantage. We can safely say that the Xperia Z1 is the better among the two - with a faster processor, a camera thatis light years ahead and similarly great design and polished user interface. The dust and water resistance is another important benefit. As for the HTC One, it is still a great device on its own. We would still recommend it for buyers on budget - after all, its price has dropped and it’s way cheaper than the Xperia Z1. The aluminum unibody frame is sturdy and feels great, too. Moreover, the One is still fairly compact while the Xperia Z1 feels a bit too big. However, if money is not an issue and you can make do with a larger phone, the Xperia Z1 is the phone to get.
From: Phone Arena
Published on: Sep 26, 2013
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HTC One vs iPhone 5s comparison review: We compare both smartphone's specs

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Submitted by MG3 on Sep 12, 2013

In terms of specs is a split decision as to which smartphone is better. We will be able to give a more definitive verdict as to which smartphone is the best once we do a full review of the iPhone 5s.
From: PC Advisor
Published on: Sep 11, 2013
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HTC One (Verizon Wireless) Review

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Submitted by MG3 on Sep 10, 2013

The HTC One continues to be a well-designed, powerful 1080p Android smartphone, but the five-month wait for a Verizon Wireless version didn't do it any favors.
From: PC Magazine
Published on: Sep 05, 2013
8.0 Rated at:

LG G2 vs HTC One

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Submitted by MG3 on Sep 04, 2013

The HTC One has aged nicely - it still has that elusive for other Android smartphones aluminum unibody, excellent speakers and rock solid overall performance. Moreover, the HTC One has one of the nicest displays out there. Even with all these assets, though, it is no match for the LG G2. There are a few reasons for that. First and foremost is the fact that LG G2 matches the HTC One in nearly all areas where it excels - the display is larger, sharp and vivid, the plastic unibody feels sturdy and extremely ergonomic, and with nearly zero bezel the plastic design does not feel irritating at all. But there is more. The LG G2 has one of the best cameras we have ever seen on an Android smartphones, and with the newest powerful Snapdragon 800 system chip it beats the HTC One in both photography and performance. All in all, without ignoring all the great things about the HTC One, the G2 still gets our praise and recommendation.
From: Phone Arena
Published on: Sep 03, 2013
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HTC One Review

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Submitted by MG3 on Aug 19, 2013

The HTC One is a brave attempt to do something different from a photography point of view. While its main smartphone rivals feature 8 or 13 megapixel cameras, at first glance the 4 megapixel sensor inside the HTC One looks like yesterday's technology. A closer look at the science behind the sensor and the images themselves soon reveals that the HTC One can still compete with the likes of the iPhone 5 and Galaxy S4, if not on out and out resolution, then certainly in terms of noise and low-light shooting. You really need to ask yourself what you want to do with your photos. If you want to make large prints or crop heavily, then the relatively low resolution of the HTC One's camera is going to limit what you can achieve (HTC themselves suggest up to 10x8 inch prints). This is especially true if you want to shoot in the 4:3 aspect ratio, rather than the default 16:9 widescreen format, as the resolution drops even further to 3 megapixels. If you want to share your images on social networks and make the odd small print, then the HTC One makes a lot more sense, as resolution is much less of a factor. And if you shoot a lot in low-light environments, it definitely has the edge over the competition.
Published on: Jun 03, 2013
8.0 Rated at:

Motorola Moto X vs HTC One

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Submitted by MG3 on Aug 15, 2013

They’re Android smartphones at heart, yet, they differ greatly inside and out. As much as the two focus on certain aspects, we’re always left to factor in pricing to the mix, which is $200 on-contract for the two. Knowing that, it would seem as though you get more bang for the buck with the HTC One and its beefier specs, premium design, and inclusion of an IR blaster. Some would overlook the Moto X at that point, but that shouldn’t be the case at all. Whereas the HTC One is all about being meticulous with its design, both in its physical form and software experience, the Moto X is more humble with its totality. It doesn’t try to win us over with its hardware, nor does it try to bombard us with a ton of new software features. Overall, the HTC One is best suited for those with a flair for physical aesthetics and supreme social networking integration – while the Moto X is best reserved for those who are down for simplicity with the Android experience.
From: Phone Arena
Published on: Aug 15, 2013
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Nokia Lumia 1020 vs HTC One

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Submitted by MG3 on Aug 07, 2013

There’s a big price disparity between these two flagships, seeing that the Nokia Lumia 1020 and HTC One are priced respectively at $300 and $200 with a 2-year contract. If we’re to look at the two from a specs standpoint, we’d make a good case for why the Lumia 1020 is such a pricey investment – and that’s despite having a superior camera on board. Looking at the two more intently, the specs are without question more drool worthy on the HTC One, as it features a larger display, higher resolution screen, a quad-core processor, and a built-in IR blaster.Ultimately though, you’ll want to gravitate towards the Nokia Lumia 1020 if taking photos and videos is most paramount to you. If it isn’t, then the HTC One will surely be the choice to stick with, since it’s an all-around contender that has the more premium design and deeper platform experience. Indeed, it doesn’t come close to matching the Lumia 1020’s quality with photos and videos, but the HTC One still delivers shots that are nonetheless still acceptable to use for 4” x 6” printouts.
From: Phone Arena
Published on: Aug 07, 2013
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HTC One Google Play Edition Review

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Submitted by MG3 on Aug 01, 2013

The arrival of the HTC One Google Play Edition is an unexpected bonus. HTC had already done an excellent job of giving differentiating its hardware and software experience on the Sense 5 version of the device. So much so, that it is almost like using an entirely different device to even the Google Play Edition even though the two devices are otherwise identical. It does, however, offer users a tantalizing decision to make. Do you opt for HTC Sense 5 version of the One or do you opt for the Google Play Edition? Or if you go for the Google Play Edition, do you then just save some dollars, storage space and other hardware specs and just go for the Nexus 4 that also runs stock Android? In reality, you can’t go wrong with any of the options listed here. The Nexus 4 is great buying, but it does not offer the cutting edge design or specifications of the HTC One. The HTC One with Sense 5 is an outstanding device that does not stray too far from the pure Google experience, yet it brings with it some interesting and useful software enhancements over and above the stock Google user experience. However, in addition to getting faster software updates when they become available, the HTC One Google Edition is also extremely fast and responsive. Google’s Android has never looked as good and worked better than it does on the HTC One Google Play Edition. Right now, it is the pinnacle of the Android user experience and it will only get better when it gets the Android 4.3 update in the near future.
From: MacNN
Published on: Jul 28, 2013
10.0 Rated at:

HTC One mini vs HTC One comparison review

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Submitted by MG3 on Jul 23, 2013

There's no point us calling a winner here as the HTC One is clearly the superior device. It's really up to you to decide whether the extra money is worth it and it's a tough call. Key things to point out include the HTC One's lower storage capacity and lack of infrared and NFC.
From: PC Advisor
Published on: Jul 22, 2013
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HTC One Review: Google Edition vs. HTC One with Sense review

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Submitted by MG3 on Jul 17, 2013

The HTC One with Sense vs. HTC One Google Edition boils down to the argument of Stock Android vs. manufacturer "skin" versions of Android. However, as much as people complain about modified calendars and messaging apps, they often forget that Google has made its stock calendar apps downloadable in Google Play. If you don't like the HTC keyboard, the standard Android version of that is also downloadable. The benefits of stock Android, from an apps perspective, can be had on any device, including the HTC One with Sense, without needing to spend $600 on an unlocked phone. With that said, why bother buying a Google Edition phone at all? The HTC One Google Edition is appealing because it delivers the best hardware option with an unmolested version of Android that is more appealing to millions of people. There's a reason that the custom ROM scene is so busy, and that's because people want great hardware with fresh software. The Google Edition meets those needs without having to jump through hoops to install the custom software. It's also likely to be more reliable and stable because it's made by people with first hand knowledge of a device's inner workings rather than an individual or small team of talented individuals tweaking and unintentionally breaking things in the process.
From: MobileBurn
Published on: Jul 16, 2013
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HTC One Google Play Edition vs HTC One

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Submitted by MG3 on Jul 17, 2013

Same hardware, different experience – that’s essentially what boils down to here. In the end, it essentially comes to which experience is most preferable to you. As we’ve clearly pointed out, the HTC Sense 5 brings out all of the qualities that would snatch up individuals that live on social networking. In contrast, the stock Android would be most ideal to those who prefer timely Android updates more than anything else. And we can’t forget pricing too, seeing that’s always a constant driving force in making any smartphone purchase decision. The Sense 5 packing HTC One is available by most carriers and retailers for $200 on-contract or less. Obviously, you’ll be saving a considerable amount of money in the short term, but you’ll be locked into a contract for 2 years. If that’s not your forte, then the Google Play Edition will be your cup of tea instead – albeit, you’ll have to fork over $600 to earn it outright.
From: Phone Arena
Published on: Jul 17, 2013
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