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Nikon D5200 Pro Reviews

TechRadar UK‘s review Edit

The Nikon D5200 is a solid performer that delivers images with well-controlled noise and plenty of detail, albeit with slight banding in some images taken at IS0 3200 and above. It's also a nicely constructed camera, and the limited number of buttons and dials make it unintimidating to novice photographers, while enthusiasts will find that they have all the control that they want within easy reach. However, given the better detail reproduction and lack of banding produced by the Nikon D5300, we recommend that potential D5200 buyers save a little longer and opt for the newer camera.
8.0 Rated at:

Published on:
Feb 12, 2014

The Imaging Resource‘s review Edit

The Nikon D5200 is a lot of camera for the money, and though it's aimed at advanced beginners in terms of image quality and capabilities, it's not too far removed from DSLRs geared for more serious photographers. Thanks to its 24.1-megapixel CMOS sensor and EXPEED 3 processor -- which seems to be the same sensor-processor combo packed into the bigger, better, newer D7100 -- the D5200 offers more resolution in a mid-level camera than Nikon's ever offered before. The camera's clean, highly detailed images rivals those of direct competitors such as the Canon T5i, as well as full-blown enthusiast models such as its big brother, the D7100. (In fact, the only thing that appears to differentiate the image quality between the Nikon D5200 and the D7100 is the latter's lack of a low pass filter, a move that earns it some better fidelity at the risk of incurring moiré.) The D5200 also produces great images at high ISOs; you can even make an acceptable 4 x 6 print at ISO 12,800.
n/a Not rated

Published on:
Jun 14, 2013

Steve's Digicams‘s review Edit

The D5200 is a powerful entry-level DSLR that's well tailored for the beginner, but won't sell more serious photographers short. High image quality, fast auto focus, and a swiveling TFT LCD are arguably the most attractive features - in particular the low noise in shots taken at high ISO settings. Lots of buttons and customizability puts a lot of power at your fingertips, though a second thumb wheel would sweeten the deal.
n/a Not rated

Published on:
Aug 15, 2013

PC Pro‘s review Edit

A cracking camera with superb image quality and a brilliant autofocus. A number of small faults prevent it from topping our A-List, however
8.3 Rated at:

Published on:
May 31, 2013

DP Review‘s review Edit

The Nikon D5200 is a solid performer that delivers excellent image quality and impressive high ISO performance along with an articulated screen and a control interface appropriate for users stepping up to a DSLR.
7.9 Rated at:

Published on:
May, 2013

PC Magazine‘s review Edit

The under-$1,000 Nikon D5200 is a capable D-SLR that delivers impressive image quality and continuous shooting at 4 frames per second, earning it our Editors' Choice.
8.0 Rated at:

Published on:
May 03, 2013

expertreviews.co.uk‘s review Edit

Well specified, especially with its 39-point autofocus, but the controls could be more elegant and our test shots tended to be slightly soft
6.0 Rated at:

Published on:
Mar 19, 2013

Camera Labs‘s review Edit

The D5200 is a solid upgrade to Nikon's upper entry level model and a real advance in a number of key areas. Its AF and metering systems were previously only available on the next model up the range - the D7000 and it has a brand new 24 Megapixel sensor that defies expectations where noise performance is concerned, delivering superior results to its main competitor, the Canon EOS Rebel T4i / 650D. The handling is better than its predecessor and there are some nice touches, like the intelligent Auto ISO override in PASM modes, the viewfinder grid overlay and the redesigned info panel. But there's still room for improvement and niggles to be ironed out. A viewfinder proximity sensor should be standard on this level of model and access to frequently used functions needs to be more direct. Also, as we've seen on other Nikon DSLR's servo focussing for movies is too erratic to be of much practical use.
8.4 Rated at:

Published on:
Mar, 2013

www.whatdigitalcamera.com‘s review Edit

Costing £649 body only, or £719 with the 18-55mm VR kit lens, the D5200 works out at £300 more than the D5100. With the latter rapidly dropping in price since the D5200's release, the D5100 can be picked up very reasonably for £419 with a kit lens. The developments to the D5200's internals - most notably the adopted 39-point AF system and 24MP sensor - result in a truly impressive specification for a consumer model. It delivers stunning image quality and it's a pleasing camera to use, but is it really worth splashing out the extra on the D5200 when Nikon is still making the D5100, which is cheaper to buy? If you plan to take advantage of the higher resolution, 50i video frame rate and Wi-Fi compatibility with the optional WU-1a adapter, then yes it is. If you can survive without these features and feel you can cope with an 11-point AF system, we'd personally opt to save our money and settle on the D5100.
9.0 Rated at:

Published on:
Jan 24, 2013

PC Advisor‘s review Edit

The Nikon D5200 is ideal for anyone wanting their first good-quality DSLR or wanting to upgrade from their current mid-range DSLR. The Nikon D5200 is well-built, comfortable and easy to use with good picture quality and provides good value for money. The only real downside was a lack of absolute sharpness in some images.
8.0 Rated at:

Published on:
Feb 21, 2013

CNET Reviews‘s review Edit

While on paper the D5200 doesn't really stand out from the specialized competition -- Canon has its video-optimized AF system, Pentax has its weather-resistant bodies, and Sony has its speedy models with built-in geotagging -- it more than succeeds as a general-purpose model for family and vacation photography.
8.0 Rated at:

Published on:
Feb 13, 2013

PhotographyBLOG‘s review Edit

The new Nikon D5200 may not reinvent the wheel in any way, but it is undoubtedly a great all-round DSLR that's well-suited to a lot of different users and experience levels, exactly what a mass-market camera should be, and judged on that criteria, the Nikon D5200 is once again a very worthy winner of our Highly Recommended award.
9.0 Rated at:

Published on:
Jan 14, 2013

Pocket-lint‘s review Edit

For its £720 price tag, the Nikon D5200 draws in the D7000's autofocus system and, considering that and the new 24-megapixel sensor's overall image quality, it's a DSLR that's a step beyond its predecessor. But it's not totally plain sailing. As enticing as the red-coloured model is from the outside, it seems to bring a little bit of the devil with it on the inside as well. In addition to the sharpness issues we had with our first review sample, it seems the new sensor isn't entirely sugar coated: banding in shadow areas of raw files and terrible interlaced tearing in movie playback are low points that hold this DSLR back from greater things. If movie capture is your thing then cross the D5200 off the list. While those points certainly cost the D5200, we've otherwise found it to be a favourable camera that will enable you to take great shots.
8.0 Rated at:

Published on:
Feb 04, 2013

www.ephotozine.com‘s review Edit

When we reviewed the D5100 in April of 2011 we were impressed and gave it our highly recommended award. The biggest change on the D5200 is the upgrade to the 24.1 megapixel CMOS sensor, with the D5200 producing 5 star quality images. The D5200 can also shoot at a faster rate of 5 fps in continuous shooting. The D5200 is compatible with a number of accessories such as the Wireless Mobile Adapter (WU-1a) allowing sharing of images with mobile devices. There are also a couple of wireless remote controls available to purchase. The body has a very familiar feel to the D5100, those who have previously used any of the D3XXX models will also find the D5200 very familiar. It's a little awkward that you have to use the i button to change many of the shooting settings, particularly as the OK button doesn't have an alternative use. The D5200 has taken all that we liked about the D5100 and tweaked slightly, meaning we are happy to highly recommend it.
9.0 Rated at:

Published on:
Jan 20, 2013

The average pro reviews rating is 8.1 / 10, based on the 14 reviews.


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